diff mbox series

[01/10] fs: don't allow kernel reads and writes without iter ops

Message ID 20200827150030.282762-2-hch@lst.de (mailing list archive)
State New
Headers show
Series [01/10] fs: don't allow kernel reads and writes without iter ops | expand

Commit Message

Christoph Hellwig Aug. 27, 2020, 3 p.m. UTC
Don't allow calling ->read or ->write with set_fs as a preparation for
killing off set_fs.  All the instances that we use kernel_read/write on
are using the iter ops already.

If a file has both the regular ->read/->write methods and the iter
variants those could have different semantics for messed up enough
drivers.  Also fails the kernel access to them in that case.

Signed-off-by: Christoph Hellwig <hch@lst.de>
Reviewed-by: Kees Cook <keescook@chromium.org>
---
 fs/read_write.c | 67 +++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++------------------
 1 file changed, 42 insertions(+), 25 deletions(-)

Comments

David Laight Aug. 27, 2020, 3:58 p.m. UTC | #1
From: Christoph Hellwig
> Sent: 27 August 2020 16:00
> 
> Don't allow calling ->read or ->write with set_fs as a preparation for
> killing off set_fs.  All the instances that we use kernel_read/write on
> are using the iter ops already.
> 
> If a file has both the regular ->read/->write methods and the iter
> variants those could have different semantics for messed up enough
> drivers.  Also fails the kernel access to them in that case.

Is there a real justification for that?
For system calls supplying both methods makes sense to avoid
the extra code paths for a simple read/write.

Any one stupid enough to make them behave differently gets
what they deserve.

	David

-
Registered Address Lakeside, Bramley Road, Mount Farm, Milton Keynes, MK1 1PT, UK
Registration No: 1397386 (Wales)
Christoph Hellwig Aug. 29, 2020, 9:23 a.m. UTC | #2
On Thu, Aug 27, 2020 at 03:58:02PM +0000, David Laight wrote:
> Is there a real justification for that?
> For system calls supplying both methods makes sense to avoid
> the extra code paths for a simple read/write.

Al asked for it as two of our four in-tree instances do have weird
semantics, and we can't change that any more.  And the other two
don't make sense to be used with kernel_read and kernel_write (
(/dev/null and /dev/zero).
Christoph Hellwig Sept. 1, 2020, 7:08 a.m. UTC | #3
Looks like since the start of this series we've grown new code to
use kernel_write on sysctl files based on boot parameters.  The good
news is that this just means I need to resurrect the sysctl series
as all that work was done already.
diff mbox series

Patch

diff --git a/fs/read_write.c b/fs/read_write.c
index 5db58b8c78d0dd..702c4301d9eb6b 100644
--- a/fs/read_write.c
+++ b/fs/read_write.c
@@ -419,27 +419,41 @@  static ssize_t new_sync_read(struct file *filp, char __user *buf, size_t len, lo
 	return ret;
 }
 
+static int warn_unsupported(struct file *file, const char *op)
+{
+	pr_warn_ratelimited(
+		"kernel %s not supported for file %pD4 (pid: %d comm: %.20s)\n",
+		op, file, current->pid, current->comm);
+	return -EINVAL;
+}
+
 ssize_t __kernel_read(struct file *file, void *buf, size_t count, loff_t *pos)
 {
-	mm_segment_t old_fs = get_fs();
+	struct kvec iov = {
+		.iov_base	= buf,
+		.iov_len	= min_t(size_t, count, MAX_RW_COUNT),
+	};
+	struct kiocb kiocb;
+	struct iov_iter iter;
 	ssize_t ret;
 
 	if (WARN_ON_ONCE(!(file->f_mode & FMODE_READ)))
 		return -EINVAL;
 	if (!(file->f_mode & FMODE_CAN_READ))
 		return -EINVAL;
+	/*
+	 * Also fail if ->read_iter and ->read are both wired up as that
+	 * implies very convoluted semantics.
+	 */
+	if (unlikely(!file->f_op->read_iter || file->f_op->read))
+		return warn_unsupported(file, "read");
 
-	if (count > MAX_RW_COUNT)
-		count =  MAX_RW_COUNT;
-	set_fs(KERNEL_DS);
-	if (file->f_op->read)
-		ret = file->f_op->read(file, (void __user *)buf, count, pos);
-	else if (file->f_op->read_iter)
-		ret = new_sync_read(file, (void __user *)buf, count, pos);
-	else
-		ret = -EINVAL;
-	set_fs(old_fs);
+	init_sync_kiocb(&kiocb, file);
+	kiocb.ki_pos = *pos;
+	iov_iter_kvec(&iter, READ, &iov, 1, iov.iov_len);
+	ret = file->f_op->read_iter(&kiocb, &iter);
 	if (ret > 0) {
+		*pos = kiocb.ki_pos;
 		fsnotify_access(file);
 		add_rchar(current, ret);
 	}
@@ -510,28 +524,31 @@  static ssize_t new_sync_write(struct file *filp, const char __user *buf, size_t
 /* caller is responsible for file_start_write/file_end_write */
 ssize_t __kernel_write(struct file *file, const void *buf, size_t count, loff_t *pos)
 {
-	mm_segment_t old_fs;
-	const char __user *p;
+	struct kvec iov = {
+		.iov_base	= (void *)buf,
+		.iov_len	= min_t(size_t, count, MAX_RW_COUNT),
+	};
+	struct kiocb kiocb;
+	struct iov_iter iter;
 	ssize_t ret;
 
 	if (WARN_ON_ONCE(!(file->f_mode & FMODE_WRITE)))
 		return -EBADF;
 	if (!(file->f_mode & FMODE_CAN_WRITE))
 		return -EINVAL;
+	/*
+	 * Also fail if ->write_iter and ->write are both wired up as that
+	 * implies very convoluted semantics.
+	 */
+	if (unlikely(!file->f_op->write_iter || file->f_op->write))
+		return warn_unsupported(file, "write");
 
-	old_fs = get_fs();
-	set_fs(KERNEL_DS);
-	p = (__force const char __user *)buf;
-	if (count > MAX_RW_COUNT)
-		count =  MAX_RW_COUNT;
-	if (file->f_op->write)
-		ret = file->f_op->write(file, p, count, pos);
-	else if (file->f_op->write_iter)
-		ret = new_sync_write(file, p, count, pos);
-	else
-		ret = -EINVAL;
-	set_fs(old_fs);
+	init_sync_kiocb(&kiocb, file);
+	kiocb.ki_pos = *pos;
+	iov_iter_kvec(&iter, WRITE, &iov, 1, iov.iov_len);
+	ret = file->f_op->write_iter(&kiocb, &iter);
 	if (ret > 0) {
+		*pos = kiocb.ki_pos;
 		fsnotify_modify(file);
 		add_wchar(current, ret);
 	}